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Aurora Borealis, a Sight of Wonders

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Aurora Borealis, a Sight of Wonders

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Imagine looking up and seeing beautiful lights dancing in the sky.  The Aurora Borealis, also known as the northern lights, are natural lights in the sky that create a beautiful light show.  The Aurora Borealis occurs when the sun sends gusts of charged solar particles across space into Earth. When the solar particles meet with our planet, Earth’s magnetic field and atmosphere react.  If the solar particles meet with the molecules and atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere, the atoms get excited and light up. According to EarthSky.org, what happens to an Aurora is similar to what happens with a neon sign.  In a neon sign, electricity is sent to a tube to excite atoms and give off beautiful lights. The colors of the Aurora depend on the gas. For example, oxygen causes a green color, nitrogen gives off a red, and gases like helium or hydrogen make blue or purple.  The Aurora Borealis appears as curtains of light, arcs or spirals.

The Aurora Borealis is extremely amazing that people will travel thousand of miles just to see them.  You can see the Aurora any time at night and its best when the sky is clear. The Aurora Borealis appears in colder places like Alaska or Norway.  According to NationalGeographic.com, the best place to go see the Aurora would be Iceland, Alaska, Canada, Norway, Northern Sweden, Northern Finland, or Greenland.  The best time to travel to see these beautiful lights would be in winter or spring. Camp out in a tent and dress comfy. Go out and lay on a blanket, look at the sky and enjoy the show.  It would be worth it to stay up all night and watch this amazing light show. The Aurora Borealis sure is full of wonders.

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Roxana, Staff Writer

Hey! My name is Roxana and this is my first year in journalism. I like to read about everything and anything. I also like to write stories. I will write...

4 Comments

4 Responses to “Aurora Borealis, a Sight of Wonders”

  1. Thomas on February 14th, 2019 7:53 pm

    Marvelous Job Roxana! Your story deserves a spot in the New York Times! Keep up the good Work!

  2. Thomas on February 14th, 2019 8:05 pm

    Great Job Roxana! Your story deserves to be on the New York Times 🙂 !

  3. Janelle Luna on February 19th, 2019 8:01 pm

    The lights are indeed beautiful! Your wording is nice and thank you for letting me know where to go if I wanted to see these gorgeous lights!

  4. Nancy Lupian on February 20th, 2019 1:53 pm

    Just by looking at the picture it seems just super beautiful!!! I hope that one day I will go see these lights!!! Keep up the good work!!!!

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Aurora Borealis, a Sight of Wonders