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Romell Broom: Innocent or Guilty?

This+undated+Ohio+Department+of+Rehabilitation+and+Correction+photo+shows+death+row+inmate+Romell+Broom%2C+whose+2009+botched+execution+was+called+off+after+two+hours.+The+Ohio+Supreme+Court+ruled+4-3+on+Wednesday%2C+March+16%2C+2016%2C+that+the+state+can+try+to+put+Broom+to+death+again%2C+rejecting+arguments+that+giving+the+state+prisons+agency+a+second+chance+would+amount+to+cruel+and+unusual+punishment+and+double+jeopardy.+%28Ohio+Department+of+Rehabilitation+and+Correction+via+AP%29
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Romell Broom: Innocent or Guilty?

This undated Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction photo shows death row inmate Romell Broom, whose 2009 botched execution was called off after two hours. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Wednesday, March 16, 2016, that the state can try to put Broom to death again, rejecting arguments that giving the state prisons agency a second chance would amount to cruel and unusual punishment and double jeopardy. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

This undated Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction photo shows death row inmate Romell Broom, whose 2009 botched execution was called off after two hours. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Wednesday, March 16, 2016, that the state can try to put Broom to death again, rejecting arguments that giving the state prisons agency a second chance would amount to cruel and unusual punishment and double jeopardy. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

AP

This undated Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction photo shows death row inmate Romell Broom, whose 2009 botched execution was called off after two hours. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Wednesday, March 16, 2016, that the state can try to put Broom to death again, rejecting arguments that giving the state prisons agency a second chance would amount to cruel and unusual punishment and double jeopardy. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

AP

AP

This undated Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction photo shows death row inmate Romell Broom, whose 2009 botched execution was called off after two hours. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Wednesday, March 16, 2016, that the state can try to put Broom to death again, rejecting arguments that giving the state prisons agency a second chance would amount to cruel and unusual punishment and double jeopardy. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

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In this world, there are criminals There is bound to be people who make poor choices, most being worse than others.  Sometimes criminals get bad enough to the point where execution is necessary. Usually, if someone is executed, that’s the end for them. They did something terrible, and now they have to pay the price. However, sometimes this may not be the case. Death row inmate Romell Broom, who had been put on the spot after various crimes, such as murder, robbery, and kidnapping, is one of the examples of these few criminals. As the court decided, he was to be executed by lethal injection on September 15th, 2009. There was one tiny issue though – they simply couldn’t.

Usually lethal injection would be an injection of, well, highly lethal chemicals that would be injected into the veins of the criminal, resulting in their death after a brief amount of time. Seems fool proof, right? Just stick in in their arm, hit a vein, and sayonara. With Broom, the process was a bit more complicated. Even after hours of trying, the state just couldn’t find easy access to any of his veins. Since the procedure wasn’t so swift and painless, as he was constantly screaming in pain from the large needles. After hours of trying, they eventually just let him go, and saved his execution for some other day

Broom’s story is a comical one, but one that should be taken very seriously. Despite the fact he was a highly dangerous criminal, it was still cruel and unusual punishment to keep poking him with needles. It would also violate double jeopardy protections, which forbid punishing someone for the same thing twice. Considering capital punishment rarely ever happens twice, Broom chose to take his case to court, but he was swiftly denied. Oddly, this wasn’t the first time something like this happened. Joseph Clark’s story is a very similar one, with the needles and all. In the end, another criminal was stopped, but not exactly in the most ideal way.

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Romell Broom: Innocent or Guilty?